The pandemic has pushed children’s mental health and access to care to a ‘crisis point’

Many adults report that the pandemic has been hard on their mental health. For kids, some experts say, it has become a crisis. Children’s hospitals around the country say they have seen a meteoric rise in the number of children who need mental health help. Access to care, which was a problem before the pandemic, particularly for kids of color, has gotten much worse. Several children’s hospitals said the supply of inpatient psychiatric beds has been so short, they’ve had to board kids in their emergency departments – sometimes for weeks. “We really have never seen anything like this rapid growth in kids presenting with mental health problems,” said Jenna Glover … at Children’s Hospital Colorado. It got so bad, Children’s Hospital Colorado declared a “state of emergency” in May. The number of kids they treated for anxiety doubled – and depression numbers tripled – compared to pre-pandemic levels. In January through April of this year, behavioral health emergency department visits were up 72% over the same time period two years ago,  the hospital said. Other hospitals saw even bigger increases. In January, Wolfson Children’s Hospital in Jacksonville, Florida, for example, said it saw a 300% increase in the number of behavioral health emergency admissions since April 2020. Nationally, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found emergency department visits for suspected suicide attempts during February and March of 2021 were more than 50% higher for teen girls, compared to 2019.

Note: See more in this Washington Post article and this even deeper article. For more along these lines, see concise summaries of deeply revealing news articles on the coronavirus from reliable major media sources.

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Author: {Want To Know}

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